Faculty profile for Kimberly Heym, Ph.D. | Capital University
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  • Kimberly Heym, Ph.D.

    Senior Lecturer

    "I engage students with their eyes, hands and ears in everything I teach, from photosynthesis and mitosis to EKGs and cranial nerves." 

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    Contact

    Biological and Environmental Sciences
    Battelle Hall
    288

    614-236-6121
    kheym@capital.edu

    • Biography

      Dr. KimHeym has been teaching at Capital since 1992. As a graduate student at The Ohio State University, she soaked up every teaching opportunity available and discovered her love to teaching while she served as a teaching assistant at OSU's College of Medicine and School of Dentistry. 


      Though her Ph.D. is in neuroscience, she enjoys teaching introductory biology and anatomy, and physiology at Capital. Her neuroscience background adds quality to her teaching as she continuously brings color and hands-on techniques to her classroom. She engages students with their eyes, hands and ears in everything she teaches, from photosynthesis and mitosis to EKGs and cranial nerves.

      Dr. Heym also advises students, sit on university and department committees and conducts research, with particular focus on the role of visual images and color in learning and working memory. 

      If her passion for teaching didn't keep her in the classroom, Dr. Heym says she would be a park ranger since she enjoys everything to do with the outdoors. When she is away from Capital, she serves as a Boy Scout leader and is active with her church.

    • Teaches

      Vertebrate Physiology 334
      Anatomy and Physiology 232
      Sophomore Seminar 200
      Foundations of Modern Biology 151
      Non-Major's Biology 100

    • Degrees

      Bachelor of Science in Physiology, Michigan Sate University
      Ph.D. in Neuroscience, The Ohio Sate University

    • Publications

      Ivery, M. and Lee, N. (2014) Do Music and Science Students Have the Same Learning Styles?Proceedings of The National Conference on Undergraduate Research, April 3-5, 2014: 1313-1321.